Stay with Me

This is a book that I had been wanting to pick up for a few months now, and it was also super great to purchase it from one of my new favorite local book stores. It’s a a cozy little spot complete with a resident cat, and every time I go there it lifts my spirit. I feel at home. So there were already great vibes surrounding this title before I even opened it to read. But when I did… I was wrapped into a complicated and intimate portrayal of a marriage that was full of unexpected surprises. Sorry folks — spoilers ahead. 

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Children of Blood and Bone

You should read this book (and give it to the children in your life to read!) because it opens your eyes to what Black imagination looks like. We should have the space to imagine ourselves in every way possible. Science fiction is not a genre reserved for people who do not look like us; I’ve never considered any of the faeries or wizards I’ve read about in my youth could have been Black like me. In Children of Blood and Bone, Tomi Adeyemi reminds us that we can be anything. 

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How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective

You should read this book if you actually care about how Black women must get free. It requires that we connect the past to the present and honor the women that came before us, who were radical before we even understood what it meant to be so, and who were willing to put their bodies on the line before we were even born. For me, this is critical literature for conscious resistance in our current time. 

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The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

I hadn’t planned to review this book this week, but the Twitter Ignants were out in rare form this week over a chapter in Issa Rae’s book that talks about how Asian men are the only men suitable for Black women. Clearly, folks just look for the chapters that are the most inflammatory when taken out of context and only read those… or more likely, don’t even read at all because, in reality, the whole book is full of hilarious takes on what it’s like to be an (oftentimes awkward) Black girl navigating America. As one of those girls, I found Issa Rae’s commentary witty and compelling in its relatability to my own life. 

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